Title Background

Nede hath no law: The State of Exception in Gower and Langland

Nede hath no law: The State of Exception in Gower and Langland

(Addendum to the Annual Bibliography for 2015.)
This article discusses the use of the legal maxim necessity knows no law in PPl and the works of John Gower. Whereas L’s usage has stirred up great controversy, Gower’s unique application of the canon law adage has received hardly any attention. On the surface, it is difficult to think of two authors less alike, and the way in which they relate the concept of necessity to different subjects (the poverty debate, fin amour) seems to support that feeling. Yet this article argues that reading L and Gower side by side is mutually illuminating. Specifically, this article reveals how their engagement with natural law challenges postmodern assumptions that inform the comparative study of law and literature. By reading L and Gower in relation to the provocative work of Giorgio Agamben, this article suggests that whereas critics traditionally prefer the exception to the law, authors like Gower seek to include the exception within the juridical order.

Volume

Accessus, 2.2 (2015), 1–44.

Author

Van Dijk, Conrad J.