Title Background

And after all myn Aue-Marie almost to the ende’: <i>Pierce the Ploughman’s Crede</i> and Lollard expositions of the Ave Maria, myn Aue-Marie almost to the ende’: <i>Pierce the Ploughman’s Crede</i> and Lollard expositions of the Ave Maria

And after all myn Aue-Marie almost to the ende’: Pierce the Ploughman’s Crede and Lollard expositions of the Ave Maria, myn Aue-Marie almost to the ende’: Pierce the Ploughman’s Crede and Lollard expositions of the Ave Maria

The narrator’s difficulties with learning the ending of the Ave Maria ” as expressed by the quotation in the title of this essay ” serves as a “hot link” to a body of texts that deal with the Ave Maria more fully. The end of the prayer is ideologically contested; Wycliffites viewed “Mary” as an improper insertion to the prayer, since, scripturally speaking, Gabriel already knew Mary’s name when he greets her (Luke 1:28). These exclusions also pertained to Jesus’ name in the third part of the prayer, credited to Urban IV in 1261. Wycliffites rejected the orthodox reading that “indulgence was a central aspect of the prayer”-as signaled by the insertion of “Jesus.” Wycliffite readers of Pierce the Ploughman’s Crede would know that the problems with the end of the Ave Maria refer to these.

Volume

ES 81.4 (2000): 273-92.

Author

Peikola, Matti